AAA Gas Watcher's Guide Now Available

Automotive, Gas Prices


(LOS ANGELES, April 15, 2008)With the cost of a gallon of gasoline averaging more than $3.75 in most parts of Southern California, the Automobile Club of Southern California is offering its updated Gas Watcher’s Guide, which offers tips to help drivers conserve fuel, save money and protect the environment. The brochure is also available in a free printed version at Auto Club offices.

The guide offers substantial information about how motorists can save gasoline and money by following 45 tips covering driving style, car maintenance, commuting and saving fuel while on vacation.

According to the U.S. Dept. of Transportation, Americans drive an average of 29 miles a day and spend more than 55 minutes of every day in their vehicles. The average vehicle is driven about 12,000 miles per year and uses 550 gallons of gasoline per year.

Southern California gas prices are among the highest in the nation because of stricter air quality regulations that require cleaner “summer blend” fuel, a limited number of refineries that supply the region and higher taxes than in many other states, according to the Auto Club’s Automotive Research Center.

“The car or truck you drive, how it’s maintained and how you drive are the most important factors in conserving fuel,” said Steve Mazor, manager of the Auto Club’s Automotive Research Center. “If you own more than one vehicle, use the more energy conserving vehicle as often as possible,” he added.

Reminder tips for getting the most out of every gallon of gasoline include:
  • Slow down. The faster a vehicle travels, the more fuel it burns. Adopt a ‘gentler’ driving style. Avoid jackrabbit starts. Accelerate gently.
  • Minimize the need to brake by anticipating traffic conditions. Be alert for slowdowns and red lights ahead of you and decelerate by coasting whenever possible.
  • Make sure the gas cap is the right one for your car. A poorly-fitted gas cap causes engine problems, increases emissions, cuts fuel economy and causes the check engine light to come on in new vehicles.
The AAA has published public-service guides on fuel economy and safety for decades. In 1943, AAA published its first fuel guide to assist with gasoline rationing required by World War II.